A comparison of the young offenders act versus the youth criminal justice act

One hour later, Garner was pronounced dead. The Wall Street Journal. Homicide Studies, 16 178—

A comparison of the young offenders act versus the youth criminal justice act

Beatrice brings to Reentry Central firsthand experience in the criminal justice system, having been incarcerated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons for 15 years. While incarcerated, Beatrice served as a consultant to the Director of the University of Connecticut's Institute for Violence Reduction, and spent her time advocating for inmates.

Library of Resources The Reentry Central Library is intended to be a ready resource for professionals and others interested in the field of prisoner reentry.

The aim of this library is to provide a succinct compendium of the leading articles, research studies, and profiles of best practices in the field. If you know of a resource which deserves to be listed on our library, please email us with your suggestion, and we will evaluate it for inclusion into our library.

We look forward to receiving your suggestions.

Youth Justice Conferences

Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Often, however, accreditation supplies little more than a thin veneer of respectability that glosses over constitutional violations and other abuses. The physical infrastructure of BOP institutions also limits the availability of appropriate housing for aging inmates.

Further, the BOP does not provide programming opportunities designed specifically to meet the needs of aging inmates. We also determined that aging inmates engage in fewer misconduct incidents while incarcerated and have a lower rate of re-arrest once released; however, BOP policies limit the number of aging inmates who can be considered for early release and, as a result, few are actually released early.

However, withholding information about criminal records could risk encouraging statistical discrimination: According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, people behind bars in state and federal prisons are nearly three times as likely to report having a disability as the nonincarcerated population, those in jails are more than four times as likely.

Prison inmates are four times as likely and jail inmates more than six times as likely to report a cognitive disability than the general population. People with mental health conditions comprise a large proportion of those behind bars, as well.

The Bureau of Justice Statistics reports that fully 1 in 5 prison inmates have a serious mental illness. Summary of National Findings, based on a survey of over While this survey was not offered to incarcerated individuals, those working with individuals with a criminal history might find it useful in their work.

View Link A Call to Action: Safeguarding New York's Children of Incarcerated Parents An Osborne Association report that details the negative, and sometimes, life-long effects parental incarceration can have on a child. The report makes several recommendations that law enforcement agencies, working in conjunction with children and family aid agencies, can do to protect these children.

We also propose that states create incentives for localities to limit their use of state prison systems. Department of Education has released a report concerning the creation of a correctional education reentry model that will bring community-based educational and job training programs into a correctional setting in an effort to provide inmates with the skills they need to be employment-ready when they are released.

The purpose of the toolkit is simple: View Link Addicted to Courts: Ashley Nellis, research analyst for the Sentencing Project, provides a comprehensive discussion of the impact of a conviction for young people who break the law. This includes bans on accessing education, housing, and public benefits, as well as placement on various community notification registries.

A comparison of the young offenders act versus the youth criminal justice act

Dr Nellis offers suggestions on how the juvenile justice system can get back to its roots of rehabilitation, not sanctions. The group was charged with promoting the use of Cost-Benefit Analysis CBA in criminal justice policy making decisions.

View Link Aging in Prison: The symposium examined the growing numbers of aging people in prison, their prison conditions, their transition back into the community and the need to increase the release of aging people who pose little or no public safety risk. This is a critical part of reducing mass incarceration and of creating a more fair, just and humane justice system.

View Link America's Toxic Prisons: View Link At America's Expense: The guide provides a wealth of information on a variety of topics related to going back to school after imprisonment.

View Link Bail Fail: View Link Banking on Bondage: The report is divided into three parts. Part two exposes the myth that privatization is a safe and cost effective way to incarcerate individuals, and part three reveals how private prison companies use cunning strategies to win support to build, or take over, more and more prisons.

View Link Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced, and Underprotected, examined data from public schools in Boston and New York City and found discrepancies in treatment toward African American girls. Commission on Civil Rights focus on discrimination, and the negative impact on the economy and public safety.

The National Website on Reentry

View Link Broken Records: View Link Childhood Disrupted:• The disparity between disclosure requirements for young offenders under the Act and the Children (Criminal Proceedings) Act ; • The status and consequences of cautions and conferences on children in NSW (for.

Like an avalanche, racial disparity grows cumulatively as people traverse the criminal justice system. This report identifies four key features of the criminal justice system that produce racially unequal outcomes and showcases initiatives to abate these sources of inequity in adult and juvenile justice systems around the country.

by Paul Gendreau Claire Goggin Centre for Criminal Justice Studies University of New Brunswick & Francis T. Cullen Department of Criminal Justice. The Youth Criminal Justice Act, which was proclaimed in force on 1 April , replaces the Young Offenders Act.

It applies to a young person, or youth, who is or who appears to be 12 years old or older, but who is less than 18 years old and who is alleged to have committed an offence as a youth. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention describes three important factors in youth violence prevention: (a) understanding factors that place youth at risk, (b) developing effective programs to overcome risk factors, and (c) enhancing the protective factors that promote resiliency.

The publisher of the Journal on European History of Law is the STS Science Centre Ltd. seated in London. The European Society for History of Law closely cooperates with the STS Science Centre Ltd. and helps with editing the journal.

GUNS AND PUBLIC HEALTH: EPIDEMIC OF VIOLENCE OR PANDEMIC OF PROPAGANDA?